Broadview Farm Summer Camp Photos

Last August, I posted a photo of a ’60s Maytag advertisement that referenced a “Maytag that went to summer camp and stayed 20 years.”

The summer camp, shown in the photo with the ad, was Broadview Farm Summer Camp in New Hampshire. The camp has long since closed but the camp has not been forgotten. Several alums of the camp have posted memories in the comments of that post and one of them, Kathie Strassburg Roberts, sent me some photos of the camp she took when she visited the property after it had closed in the ’90s.

Matt Ralph

Matt Ralph

I'm the editor of Summer Camp Culture and also blog at Tangzine.com and MatthewRalph.com. I live in the Philadelphia area and went to camps and camp meetings growing up in Ohio, Maryland and New Jersey.

24 Comments

    1. Not from 1973 but from 1945 when it was run by Elizabeth Scott (Scottie) and Dr. Harms.

      I went there 2 summers and both experiences remain etched in my memory. The boys slept in the barn that first summer; the second summer we were housed in the attic of the house. There were leaches in Lily Pond but also good fishing. We had great freedom to come and go as we pleased.

    2. Hi Glen..there are pix of you on the facebook page for Broadview Farm Camp alumni Laura Koshovar (Kirshbaum) is the page admin… Join and look.. if you can tag anything go ahead… Remember you

    3. hey Glen, I remember you! I was there from 1972-1980. My last name was Kirschbaum back then. I was one of the senior girls. We have a facebook site “Broadview Farm Camp Alumni”. A lot of folks from your year are there, including many of your old charges. Great to hear from you.

  1. Hi Glen and Marcie

    There is a Broadview Farm Page on Facebook along with loads of Pix of the old camp. Along with a history of what happened to the camp.

      1. Yes..Broadview Farm camp Alumni I think you have to get permission from the page’s admin Laura Kochevar… she will give you full rights.. btw I am guessing you were at the old camp..the one by Robert’s house.

  2. I have no desire to join Facebook or any of its equivalents. Yet I would like to see the photos. Yahoogroups would work, or why not post them here?
    Camp Broadview Farms 1947-1950

    1. Facebook is my one social site.. the advantage of that is that everyone who was in the picture signed the pix on the back.. I have the original. Those are listed under the picture.

  3. My aunt was the cook Lois Green, Pauline,and my parents worked there with her. I attended for many years. I was in that Maytag picture and still have my copy. I am the little black girl eating my marshmallow .

    1. Hi Virginia… I remember you … didn’t realize Lois was your Aunt.. Wow… hope all is going well for you.

  4. I remember those swings well. One summer we organized competition on who could fly the furthest when coming off the swing at the high point of the swing. Also Dr Harms had a workshop in the barn, and we swiped tools and hid them in a secret spot until he found it and took them back and locked the workshop. It was located where cows would have been kept in the barn.

  5. oh what memories – the Northern Lights, getting lost in the forest (minimal supervision)
    wonderful hay rides at night, dancing and shouting in the streets of town when WWII was announced over and won in ’45, the barn with it’s old record player (Perry Como singing “Prisoner of Love” – I still remember the words) and all the dances and events there, my first kiss from Bob Sato a kid from Brooklyn – who knows what happened to him? we picked berries before breakfast early in the a.m. and had raw milk with them on the long wooden benches; (the food was good). second year there we had to do dishes and other chores – I guess help was hard to find, oour parents sent us to summer camp because the city was dangerous with crowded pools and Polio rampant, and of course beaming Dr. Harms (a strange name for the owner of a children’s camp). Happy cherished childhood memories all these decades. I see my brother Marcel wrote something as well. Because of that introduction to country life, I was always longing for a rural life and now have had that for 18 years after most of the years in big cities. Kind of sad to see the photos of decay – but wonderful also, in a way. (as I write i see that the first letter of each sentence is missing and hope it shows in the final version)

  6. I have a few photos of the camp and some campers from the 1940’s that I found in my mom’s scrapbook. I am happy to email them to anyone interested…

  7. I have such wonderful memories of camp. I went there for three years in the early sixties. The Hansons were directors that I remember..and they were from Maine and had a few kids. I remember Lois and her amazing food.
    Ingrid was the senior girls counselor. We lived upstairs in the main farmhouse. I remember Jim would take the senior boys on nature hikes and that he had a nature house where I held my first snake. A green racer.
    I remember Laura Freundlich who was my best friend at camp. She had such long hair that she wore in a beautiful braid down her back.
    I remember the lake and picking blueberries on the path down to it. I remember Cherokee the horse and goats and a pig and bunnies. I remember the barn.
    I heard my first Bob Dylan song in the library. Andy and Howard were the counselors who played the LP for us.
    I got stung by those wasps near the library.
    I remember the truck and piling in and going all sorts of places. Jay was the person who drove at the time. We went on hikes up Canon Mountain and learned how to sleep on the ground..build a fire..and cook with no pots and pans.
    And yes..I remember the Maytag photo. I am in it in the foreground with plaid shorts and a barette in my hair.

  8. I think camp changed me in a very good way..forever.
    Scotty had a station wagon that it seemed she drove a thousand mph but would stop on a dime to pull to the side of the road to pick wild tiger lilies.
    My family visited her at her house out on Long Island and at her apartment in NYC. I loved her and the professor very much.

  9. I was a counselor for the boys bunk in the summer of 1969. I remember Scottie very well. She had us waking up at 6:15 to jog down to the brook and back in time for Lois’s delicious breakfasts. Would love to reconnect with anyone who might remember that summer.

  10. I attended Broadview Farm for a few summers in the late 40’s and early fifties. .I do remember Dr. Harms. I had my first girlfriend, Doris, and my first kiss on the big woodpile down by the lake. And I remember pulling leeches off from the lake. I would love to see any photos, any memories. My email address is seniorbachelor@yahoo.com. Richard
    Roe

    1. Richard, I remember you!
      Hard to forget Dr Harms or Scotty.
      Also remember that big sawdust pile. It’s long gone, cleaned out to end polluting the lake.
      Do you remember “Larry holes”? Or why the name?
      Wish I didn’t remember the leeches.

    2. Hi Richard

      My name is Neil and I was a camper about 10 years after you. There is a Facebook page called “Broadview Farm Camp Alumni” … the Admin is Laura Kockevar and just ask her for entry there are hundreds of pictures from the 50s, 60s and 70s Enjoy

  11. I remember the camp well. A high school teacher who became a friend — Bob Lemer, and his partner, Bill Stiles — lived in the old red farmhouse across the road and down a bit. Bill was a talented carpenter and did a lot of repair and renovation work while the camp was still operating. Their house was a gathering place for former students from the Boston area, where Bob used to teach, and local kids with youthful energy and a taste for beer and rock & roll. I visited often, and on warm summer days we went down to swim in the pond. There was a great view from the hilltop down to the beaver damm

    1. That beaver dam was around a long time despite Dr. Harms trying to discourage the beavers. He put a pipe through it to try to drain the beaver’s pond, and they blocked the pipe. I walked across the dam in the summers of 1949 and 1950. A large bee hive hung from a tree near the dam.

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